Wednesday, March 20, 2013

Kuih Talam Tokyo


Talam Tokyo, what  cute name,one of my FB friends asked, why the name Talam Tokyo? And in Tokyo don't have this kuih....haha...I also don't know, but in Malaysia there're many unique name for the food....like Tepung Bunga ( Flower Flour), or Mee Racun  ( Poisonous Noodle)...etc...
Back to this talam, it taste sososo good,really really nice. It almost same like seri muka, the difference is bottom part we use Sago instead of glutinous rice. Sago give a nice and soft texture.For those who can't take much glutinous rice, you can try this.

I copied this recipe from Annie, do hop over to her blog ,her kuih talam looks greener than mine, so beautiful!

Ingredients :
150g Sago (small sized)
30g Glass Noodles (aka Soo Hoon / Tang Hoon)
50g Grated Coconut
50ml Coconut Milk
150ml Water
½ tsp Salt

For Top Layer
2 Eggs
150ml Sugar
200ml Coconut Milk 
200ml Water + 2 Pandan Leaves (Blend them together, strained, keep the juice)
50g Custard Powder
few drops of Green Coloring or Pandan Paste
½ tsp Alkaline Water ( I omitted this)
½ tsp Salt

Method (for Bottom Layer)
Wash sago, soaked in water for 30mins, drained.
Wash glass noodles, soaked in WARM water for 30mins, drained and snip into about 1 inch length (or shorter if you want)
Prepare a 7' x 7' inch cake tin. Line a layer of cling wrap paper at the bottom of the cake tin. Lightly grease the cake tin with oil.
Combine all Bottom Layer ingredients in the cake tin. mix well and spread the mixture evenly.
Under a steaming wok, steam the bottom layer kueh under high heat for about 25 minutes. Use a spoon to kinda gently press it if you find that the layer of kueh is uneven.

Method (for Top Layer)
First, blend the pandan leaves and water together, strained and set the pandan juice aside. Wash the blender, and make sure it is free from pandan leaves residues.
With clean blender, combine all Top Layer ingredients together and blend it away.
Strain the mixture, and pour the mixture straight to the wok. Under very low fire, continuously stirring, cook the mixture until thickened and almost going to boil, NOT boiling.
Pour the mixture on top of the steamed bottom layer kueh. If you are worried that it will have some lumps in there, strain the mixture one more time before you pour them in.
With a clean white cloth cover on top of the kueh, steam it for 25 minutes.
Once kueh is cooked, let the cake cooled down COMPLETELY before unmould and cut for serving. 

If you don't have clean cloth to cover the kueh during steaming, the vapor water will drip down, and your kueh will end up having lots of dimples. To prevent that, there are 3 ways.

1. Use those chinese bamboo steamer cover. Those that dim sum restaurants used.
2. Cover the kueh with clean cloth. But the cloth MUST NOT touch the surface of the kueh.
3. Stand infront of the steamer, For every 4 or 5 minutes, remove the steam cover and give the steam cover a very quick wipe, to wipe away the vapor water, and cover it back. This is to prevent steam water drip down. But this motion must be fast, and of course, the most tedious method. But if your kueh still have some vapor drips dimples, gently use toilet roll to absorb the water away from the surface of the kueh. 

I'm submitting this to Malaysian Food Fest hosted by Annie of Annielicious Food

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3 comments:

Janine said...

i actually never knew it was called kueh talam tokyo! it's one of my favourite kuehs and yours look amazing!

Marsita yahya said...

nice kueh...

Jeannie Tay said...

i like this too although some people prefer don't, yours looks really nice! You cut it so neat!